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Non-gonococcal urethritis

What is Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU)? And what is it includes?
How is NGU spread?
What is the symptom?
How can it be treated? And what I do after treatment?
What happens if NGU is not treated?
What is Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU)? And what is it includes?

Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) is an inflammation of the urethra that is not caused by gonorrhea. There are many causes of NGU, including the following bacterium:

・Chlamydia
Mycoplasma Genitalium
Mycoplasma Hominis
Ureaplasma Urealyticum and Ureaplasma Parvum

How is NGU spread?
Most of the bacterium causing NGU can be passed during sexual activities, which includes: vaginal, anal or oral sex. Besides, an infected woman may pass the disease to the baby through the birth canal.

What is the symptom?
Men may experience:
Painful or burning sensation when urinating
Unusual discharge from the penis, discharge may be appear in white, yellow or green
Frequent urination
Painful or swollen testicles

Women may experience:
・A Painful and/or burning sensation when urinating
Increase vaginal discharge
Abdominal pain or abnormal vaginal bleeding

Infection in other area, like anal or oral, may notice:
Itchiness or pain
Discharge

How can it be treated? And what I do after treatment?
NGU can be cured with proper treatment.
Antibiotics treatments
You and your sex partner are advised to have treatment if one of you is found to have NGU

After the treatment:
Wait seven days to have a recheck of gonorrhea after finishing all prescribed medications to ensure the infections are cleared
Abstain from sex contact until the retest is showing a negative result in gonorrhea

What happens if NGU is not treated?
NGU can cause serious consequences for both men and women if left untreated:
Epididymitis, arthritis and skin lesions in men
Vaginitis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) in women
Possibly reduce fertility for both men and women
For Chlamydia infection, the newborn may suffer from chlamydial conjunctivits or pneumonia

Reference:

http://www.ashasexualhealth.org/stdsstis/ngu/

https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/stdfact-chlamydia.htm